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    david barrett

  

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What is Palestine? Who are the Palestinians?
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PostFri Aug 13, 2010 8:10 am     Defending Jewish Tradition    


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http://jewishisrael.ning.com/p.....es_network


Posted by Jewish Israel on August 12, 2010 at 4:30pm


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.Can messianic times truly be upon us? Well the month of Elul certainly is. In a ground-breaking decision it appears that the Israeli secular high court has come to the rescue of Jewish tradition by applying the concept of teshuva to the Law of Return.



The Jerusalem Post reports on a stunning case of a Jewish convert to Christianity who apparently will not be allowed into Israel under the Law of Return until she can prove and convince the Interior Ministry of her renewed commitment to the Jewish people.

Justices Neal Hendel, Elyakim Rubinstein and Hanan Meltzer rendered the decision and upheld the unique status of the Jewish people by drawing from historical documentation, secular legal precedents, and Jewish tradition.

The secular court of Israel apparently outshined the London and Tel Aviv rabbinical courts, which maintained that the woman in question had the status of a Jew (although she had abandoned Judaism). According to the JPost editorial report, the justices noted that “… communities throughout the ages regularly ostracized these people, … suggesting that in modern Israel the refusal to reinstate citizenship was a legitimate response…” to those who have abandoned their Jewish identity.

The justices also cited a decision by former president of the Supreme Court Aharon Barak who, “basing himself on solely secular criteria, acknowledged in 1987 that a Jew who believed Jesus was a savior had removed himself from the Jewish collective and was, therefore, to be denied Israeli citizenship under the Law of Return.”

In an age where so many of our rabbis are confused it appears that redemption and wisdom can come from the least expected of places.

The whole episode sounds too good to be true, so Jewish Israel will investigate further and keep our readership informed. In the meantime, to paraphrase Pirke Avot, “In a place where there are no rabbis, try to uphold Jewish tradition”.

One comment:
This is fantastic news. I just hope that those Jews who have been tricked and are being tricked by the Missionaries and Messianics in Israel, will read this and have a better understanding of what they are doing.


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    david barrett

  

MidEastTruth.com - the first 13 yearsMidEastTruth.com
The first 13 years!

 

What is Palestine? Who are the Palestinians?
What is Palestine?
Who are the Palestinians?


See Also:

 


PostFri Aug 13, 2010 8:11 am     A Palestinian people, yes, a Jewish people, no    


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IN CONTINUATION THE FOLLOWING HAS RELEVANCE


Just as Jews are not the ones who will determine whether the Palestinians are a people or not, Salman Masalha cannot determine whether the Jews are a people or not. It is a question of self-determination.

By Shlomo Avineri

Like many readers, I enjoyed the delicate irony, sharp wit and clever Arab tales featured in Salman Masalha's op-ed ("A Jewish and Democratic Restaurant," August 9 ). But these virtues cannot compensate for the fundamental misunderstanding that underlies his concluding declaration: "There is no such thing as a Jewish democratic state, just as there is no Muslim democratic state." That is where the dog is buried, to continue the animal metaphors.


At the root of this sentence lies a deep, tragic misunderstanding that characterizes many Arab positions on Israel's identity. In the standard Arab view, "Jews" are comparable to "Christians" or "Muslims." In other words, they are a religious group, not a nation. And it is not only Arabs who think this way.
There is no doubt that for hundreds of years, Jewish identity was perceived by Jews and non-Jews alike primarily as a religious identity, and some still think so.

But the essence of the Zionist revolution is the view that the Jews are a nation, and as such, they have the right to national self-determination in a political framework. This principle was accepted by the United Nations on November 29, 1947, in its decision to partition British Mandatory Palestine into two states - Jewish and Arab (not Jewish and Muslim-Christian ).

Israel views itself as a Jewish nation-state, exactly as Poland views itself as a Polish nation-state and Greece as a Greek nation-state, or as the Palestinian state, when it arises, will view itself as a Palestinian nation-state.

To be sure, Jewish identity has a religious component, both historically and in our contemporary reality - just as there is a religious dimension to Polish national identity and a Muslim dimension to Arab national identity (Mohammed is not perceived exclusively as the prophet of Islam; Christian Arabs too view him as a hero of the Arab nation ).

One of the problems that complicates attempts to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is this very issue - the fact that the Arab side has difficulty recognizing that Jews in the state of Israel view themselves as a nation. Identity is a matter of self-definition, not external definition. Just as Jews are not the ones who will determine whether the Palestinians are a people or not (there are more than a few of us who have yet to be reconciled with the existence of the Palestinian people ), Salman Masalha cannot determine whether the Jews are a people or not. It is a question of self-determination.

Anyone who rejects the Jews' right to define themselves as a nation denies them a fundamental human right, to which Jews, just like the Palestinians, are entitled. Arab refusal to accept Israel as a Jewish state attests to something very deep and troubling: unwillingness to accept the Jewish people's right to self-determination.

Because what is at issue is national identity, not religious identity, there can indeed be a Jewish democratic state, just as there can be an Arab democratic state. That, incidentally, is what is written in the constitution of Lebanon, an Arab state that, for all its problems, maintains a political system based on elections and democratic principles.

Clause B of the Preamble to the Lebanese Constitution declares: "Lebanon is Arab in its identity and in its associations." Clause D stipulates: "The people are the source of authority and sovereignty." In other words, Lebanon views itself as an Arab, democratic state.

The constitutions of Syria and Egypt also define their countries' identities as Arab and their systems of government as democratic. While there are, to say the least, problems with the democratic aspect of these countries' regimes, it is nonetheless clear that the drafters of the Syrian and Egyptian constitutions believed that, in principle, there is no contradiction in a state being both Arab and democratic.

And so Arab and democratic is fine, but Jewish and democratic is not?
In my dictionary, there is a whiff of racism in this distinction.


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