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PostSun Apr 02, 2006 6:00 am     Pipes calls war a success    


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Pipes calls war a success

By Bill Steigerwald
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
April 1, 2006

It's no surprise Middle East scholar Daniel Pipes has made so many political friends and enemies. A conservative columnist, counter-terrorism analyst and author or co-author of 18 books, he's a staunch supporter of Israel and a harsh critic of radical Islam.

Praised as an "authoritative commentator on the Middle East" by his allies at the Wall Street Journal, he's been branded "an anti-Islamist extremist" by some Arab-American groups. He's also the founder of the Middle East Forum (www.meforum.org <http://www.meforum.org/> ), which, among other things, has a Web site called Campus Watch that monitors how Middle East studies are taught at U.S. colleges.

Pipes will be a keynote speaker Thursday night at Grove City College's star-studded conference on the prospects of spreading democracy in the Arab world, "Mr. Jefferson Goes to the Middle East," April 5-6 (Info: 724-458-3302). I talked to Pipes by phone Tuesday from Sydney, Australia.

Q: Were you in favor of going to war in Iraq, and how do you think it's progressing or regressing?

A:
I was in favor. I continue to be in favor of the campaign to eliminate the rule of Saddam Hussein, with all the dangers to the Iraqis, to the region and to ourselves. From April 2003 on, I have argued that the U.S. government and its allies should have lower expectations than actually is the case. That we should treat the Iraqis like adults; that we should understand that they are going to run their own future, their own destiny, not us; that our role there is at best advisory, and that we should be patient. So lower expectations and a longer time horizon.

Q: Does that mean a significant change in what we are doing now, in terms of policy. Should we announce withdrawals?

A:
The number of troops is not my issue. It's the placement and role of the troops. For three years now I have been protesting the use of American troops to mediate between tribes, help rebuild electricity grids, oversee school construction, which seems to me to be a wrong use of our forces, of our money. The Iraqis should be in charge of that. We should keep the troops there, in the desert, looking after the international boundaries, making sure there are no atrocities, making sure oil and gas goes out, otherwise leaving Iraq to the Iraqis.

Q: How do you define your politics?

A:
Conservative.

Q: You're not one of those neocons who allegedly talked President Bush into going to war in the Middle East?

A:
I have been called a neoconservative. I don't exactly know how a neoconservative differs from a conservative.

Q: Do you generally agree with President Bush's Middle East policy -- its goals and its methods?

A:
I agree with the goals much more than the methods. I just gave an example of Iraq, where I believe the goal of getting rid of Saddam Hussein and trying to have a free and prosperous Iraq are worthy goals. I criticize the implementation. The same goes with democracy. I think democracy is a great goal for the region. I criticize the implementation; I think it's too fast, too American, too get-it-done yesterday.

Q: Is there anything major that the Bush administration should do now to make things go smoother?

A:
We did something good in getting rid of the Taliban and getting rid of Saddam Hussein. That is really the extent of our role, to get rid of the hideous totalitarian regimes.

Let me add that I see these issues as basically sidelines. We are engaged in a war, a profound war and long-term war, in which Afghanistan and Iraq are sideshows. The real issue is the war that radical Islam, a global phenomenon, has declared on us and that has already been underway for many years, and we're still at the beginning of it. That's the really major issue.

Q: Recently I talked to Peter Galbraith and Ivan Eland, foreign policy experts who both favor a three-part partition of Iraq as a way to forestall or make a civil war in Iraq go away. Any thoughts on that?

A:
Well, the neighborhood is unanimously against it and Iraqis are fearful of it, so I don't think there is much of a chance.

Q: What should U.S. policy be in the Middle East?

A:
Well, I endorse the president's vision of a Middle East that is no longer under the control of tyrants, as it is today, or despots -- unelected officials, at best. But it is a long-term project that's going to take decades, not months, and has to be approached with that in mind.

Secondly, if we go too fast, as is the case, we bring our most fervent enemies to power, as we've seen most dramatically in the Palestinian territories, where a terrorist organization (Hamas) won a majority of Palestinian support. One can see that also in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Egypt, Algeria.

We have to be very cautious about pushing a process before the people of the area are really quite ready for it -- until they've gone beyond what I call the "totalitarian temptation," so that they have a more balanced, moderate view of the world than they do at this time.

Q: Do they have a lot of catching up to do?

A:
To give an imperfect analogy: Germany went through a hideous period between 1933 and 1945. The condition of the Muslim world is not that bad but it's comparable. It's going through a particularly bad time. ... Our goal is to help the Muslim world move beyond this war through educational programs and other means. Fundamentally, we're at war with a substantial minority of the Muslim world and we are at war with them because they have declared war on us and we have to answer that.

Q: What is the biggest lesson you have learned from the Iraq war?

A:
The ingratitude of the Iraqis for the extraordinary favor we gave them -- to release them from the bondage of Saddam Hussein's tyranny. They have rapidly interpreted it as something they did and that we were incidental to it. They've more or less written us out of the picture.

Q: How will we know when the occupation or the invasion of Iraq was a success or a failure?

A:
Oh, it was a success. We got rid of Saddam Hussein. Beyond that is icing.

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    Shmata

  

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PostWed May 31, 2006 2:17 pm        


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wow. what a crock of crap. that guy has to be the biggest idiot this side of mideast truth.


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    HBendor

  

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PostWed Jun 07, 2006 8:51 am     Without a broom handle    


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Quote:
"Shmata" writes the following uncorroborated bunk... wow. what a crock of crap. that guy has to be the biggest idiot this side of mideast truth.


Since we do not know your educational background and of course your potential knowledge on the subject matter... We do not know if you have the right to state the above as a 'non authority'! We must then conclude, that this is just an "EMOTIONAL OUTBURST" from your part...

WE??? Are 'I' and my 'EGO'!!!


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    Starman3000m

  

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PostWed Jun 07, 2006 12:55 pm        


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I have great respect for the courage and truth that Dr. Pipes and his organization expose about the dangers of Islam.
More people should heed his warnings and the warnings of others like him instead of remaining in denial and having the complacent attitude as found in the "politically correct agenda"


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    Shmata

  

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PostThu Oct 12, 2006 3:56 pm        


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Here Pipes' assessment of success is clearly refuted by none other than James Baker.

Baker's Panel Rules Out Iraq Victory

BY ELI LAKE - Staff Reporter of the Sun
October 12, 2006
URL: http://www.nysun.com/article/41371
A D V E R T I S E M E N T
A D V E R T I S E M E N T

WASHINGTON — A commission formed to assess the Iraq war and recommend a new course has ruled out the prospect of victory for America, according to draft policy options shared with The New York Sun by commission officials.

Currently, the 10-member commission — headed by a secretary of state for President George H.W. Bush, James Baker — is considering two option papers, "Stability First" and "Redeploy and Contain," both of which rule out any prospect of making Iraq a stable democracy in the near term.

More telling, however, is the ruling out of two options last month. One advocated minor fixes to the current war plan but kept intact the long-term vision of democracy in Iraq with regular elections. The second proposed that coalition forces focus their attacks only on Al Qaeda and not the wider insurgency.

Instead, the commission is headed toward presenting President Bush with two clear policy choices that contradict his rhetoric of establishing democracy in Iraq. The more palatable of the two choices for the White House, "Stability First," argues that the military should focus on stabilizing Baghdad while the American Embassy should work toward political accommodation with insurgents. The goal of nurturing a democracy in Iraq is dropped.

The option papers, which sources inside the commission have stressed are still being amended and revised as the panel wraps up its work, give a clearer picture of what Mr. Baker meant in recent interviews when he called for a course adjustment.

They also shed light on what is at stake in the coming 2 1/2 months for the Iraqi government. The "Redeploy and Contain" option calls for the phased withdrawal of American soldiers from Iraq, though the working groups have yet to say when and where those troops will go. The document, read over the telephone to the Sun, says America should "make clear to allies and others that U.S. redeployment does not reduce determination to attack terrorists wherever they are." It also says America's top priority should be minimizing American casualties in Iraq.

Both Mr. Baker and his Democratic co-commissioner, Lee Hamilton, have said for nearly a month that the coming weeks and months are crucial for the elected body in Baghdad. More recently, Mr. Baker has said he is leaning against counseling the president to withdraw from Iraq.

Mr. Bush yesterday spoke approvingly of his father's old campaign manager and top diplomat, saying he looked forward to seeing "what Jimmy Baker and Lee Hamilton have to say about getting the job done."

The president also said he was not averse to changing tactics. But he repeated that the strategic goal in Iraq is to build "a country which can defend itself, sustain itself, and govern itself." He added, "The strategic goal is to help this young democracy succeed in a world in which extremists are trying to intimidate rational people in order to topple moderate governments and to extend the caliphate."

But the president's strategic goal is at odds with the opinion of Mr. Baker's expert working groups, which dismiss the notion of victory in Iraq. The "Stability First" paper says, "The United States should aim for stability particularly in Baghdad and political accommodation in Iraq rather than victory."

Mr. Baker in recent days has subtly been sounding out this theme with interviewers. On PBS's "Charlie Rose Show," Mr. Baker was careful to say he believed the jury was still out on whether Iraq was a success or a failure. But he also hastened to distinguish between a Middle East that was "democratic" and one that was merely "representative."

"If we are able to promote representative, representative government, not necessarily democracy, in a number of nations in the Middle East and bring more freedom to the people of that part of the world, it will have been a success," he said.

That distinction is crucial, according to one member of the expert working groups. "Baker wants to believe that Sunni dictators in Sunni majority states are representative," the group member, who requested anonymity, said.

Both option papers would compel America to open dialogue with Syria and Iran, two rogue states that Iraqi leaders and American military commanders say are providing arms and funds to Iraq's insurgents. "Stabilizing Iraq will be impossible without greater cooperation from Iran and Syria," the "Stability First" paper says.

The option also calls on America to solicit aid and support from the European Union and the United Nations, though both bodies in the past have spurned requests for significant aid for Iraq.

Because of the politically explosive topic of the Baker commission, the panel has agreed not to release its findings until after the November 7 elections. The commission, formally known as the Iraq Study Group, was created by Congress in legislation sponsored by Rep. Frank Wolf, a Republican of Virginia and close confidant of Mr. Bush's. Mr. Baker has said he will likely present the panel's findings in December.

October 12, 2006 Edition > Section: National > Printer-Friendly Version


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    Peter42y2

  

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PostSat Oct 28, 2006 4:54 am        


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Quote:
The ingratitude of the Iraqis for the extraordinary favor we gave them -- to release them from the bondage of Saddam Hussein's tyranny.



Pipes look an idiot to me.

Look at this powerfull text written by an iraqi girl.
Its about freedom.


"I had a lot of discussions with Americans who stand by their Bush’s war saying be patient this is all for your future freedom.
Maybe no one told them but to those who speak of freedom please know that I do not feel my freedom when I am locked at my house 24/7 unless I go out wearing, against my will , a scarf on my head to fill the car with fuel or to shop some food for stock.

I do not feel my freedom every time I look to mirror and see my hair which will soon give me the Iraqi gypsy look when its length will probably hit the end of my spine when I cannot pay a visit to my hair dresser who is less than 10 minutes away from my home.

I cannot feel my freedom every time I pick up the phone to hear about the numbers of people getting killed everyday from family and relatives.

I cannot feel my freedom when I hear the mortar sounds hitting my neighborhood or being launched from my neighborhood.

I cannot feel my freedom when I see our children dying just because our liberators and our government is busy with more important things rather than providing the appropriate care for our hospitals.

I cannot find my freedom when I am freezing in winter and burning in summer due to the lack of oil and electricity and then have to watch my old parents tossing and turning in bed for the same reasons.

I cannot find my freedom when we cannot cook our food because of the lack of gas cylinders.

I cannot see freedom when think of how many times the ING and Iraqi Police insulted me and tried to attack me just because I risked going out without a veil. Wanted to live my freedom and act myself actually. I was crazy.

I cannot feel freedom when I look at my cousin and her fatherless baby. ".


Who can blame her for not being gratefull to her liberators?

Pipes is an idiot since he just does not realize the mess iraq is in.





[/quote]


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    Shmata

  

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PostMon Nov 27, 2006 1:31 pm        


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Sorry - I just now saw HBendor's response. Excuse me, but are you questioning anyone's right to post on this board? What gives you the right? What Pipes said was crap, and unless all you do is watch fox news or just read this forum and other propaganda, I'm not sure how any intelligent person could think otherwise.

The issue at hand, unless you forgot, is calling the war in Iraq a success, which it clearly is not and has never been. Simply accepting what the Bush administration says makes one look like a fool. This was a war of choice and a poor one at that.

Can anyone say that Israel is better off now with Iran emboldened? I don't think so. Hussein was not a threat. Further, he was contained.


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    Shmata

  

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PostTue Dec 05, 2006 11:20 am     Re: Without a broom handle    


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[quote="HBendor"]
Quote:
"Shmata" writes the following uncorroborated bunk... wow. what a crock of crap. that guy has to be the biggest idiot this side of mideast truth.


Since we do not know your educational background and of course your potential knowledge on the subject matter... We do not know if you have the right to state the above as a 'non authority'! We must then conclude, that this is just an "EMOTIONAL OUTBURST" from your part...

WE??? Are 'I' and my 'EGO'!!![/quote]

Since you are clearly an expert on the war in Iraq, I'm curious to hear your response to Pipes' assessment that the war is a success?[/i]


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